Thailand

Why Thailand?

Friendly, delightful, refreshing

Asia’s number 1 tourist destination springs to mind with most people when asked about their dream-holiday. Turquoise waters, white beaches, vibrant cities, ancient cultures, lush jungles, mouth-watering food and most of all, smiling faces.

The roaring events in the recent past have not been able to change the idyllic perception most travellers have of Thailand, proof of just how strong this ‘brand’ is. Traditional highlights and ‘surprises around every corner’ satisfy both the holiday maker and seasoned traveller, the first timer and the repeater. With the right balance of sights and surprises, Thailand will stay firmly positioned as a favourite destination for many years to come.

Calendar of Event

Start dateEnd dateTitleLocationDescription
13 April 1815 April 18Songkran FestivalWhole CountryThe Songkran Festival, also known as the Traditional Thai New Year, is usually celebrated in mid-April. It is one of Thailand’s grandest and most important events. The Songkran Festival is a time when family and friends gather to pay gratitude to elders and visit temples for prayer and offering. Songkran literally means to pass or move into. The Songkran Festival is an amazing event in Thailand which is used to welcome the New Year. During this period, you’ll enjoy fun-filled local entertainments and fun. Depending on which area within Thailand, the celebration can last between 3 to 10 days.
16 June 1818 June 18Phi Ta KhonLoeiBuddhist legend tells the tale that centuries ago Prince Vessandorn (believed to be the penultimate incarnation of Buddha) returned to the village in which he was previously banished. The community were so overwhelmed and happy by his return they rushed into the streets to celebrate. In all the commotion and the excitement the noise from the crowds was so grandiose it woke the dead spirits from the forest nearby. Today the parade entices the masses every year after year with a spectacular surge of dancing spirits throughout the streets and is seemingly the Asian equivalent to Halloween.
8 October 1816 October 18Nine Emperor Gods FestivalPhuketOne of the most exciting aspects of the festival are the various, (and sometimes gruesome) ceremonies which are held to invoke the gods. Firewalking, body piercing and other acts of self mortification undertaken by participants acting as mediums of the gods, have become more spectacular and daring as each year goes by. Men and women puncture their cheeks with various items including knives, skewers and other household items. It is believed that the Chinese gods will protect such persons from harm, and little blood or scarring results from such mutilation acts. This is definitely not recommended for the faint hearted to witness.
9 October 1817 October 18Vegetarian FestivalWhole CountryThe origins of the Vegetarian Festival are Chinese, a celebration to the nine Emperor Gods, and the festival happens during the ninth Chinese lunar month every year. Although it is called the vegetarian festival, the diet is strictly vegan, as the requirements include giving up all fish, dairy, meat and poultry for nine days as a way to cleanse your body. Rules also state that you should wear white from head to toe, but this is not as widely practiced outside temples. Phuket is often seen as the centre of Thailand’s Vegetarian Festival, as over 30 percent of the population have Chinese ancestry. Rituals during the height of the festival include tongue slashing and other gory rituals. Bangkok celebrations might seem a little subdued compared to that, but still very much worth a visit.
23 October 18 Full moon of the 11th lunar month (October)Naga fireball FestivalNhong KaiNaga fireballs also known as bung faipayanak or Mekong lights, are a phenomenon said to be often seen on the Mekong River. Glowing balls are alleged to naturally rise from the water high into the air. The balls are said to be reddish and to range in size from smaller sparkles up to the size of basketballs. They quickly rise up to a couple of hundred metres before disappearing. The number of fireballs reported varies between tens and thousands per night. The phenomenon is named after the Phaya Naga, legendary serpent-like creatures said to live in the Mekong.
21 November 1823 November 18Yi Peng FestivalChiang MaiLoy Krathong is preceded by Yi Peng (The Lantern Festival), during which people release floating lanterns into the sky. It is during Yee Peng that you see locals' homes and public places decked out in colourful hanging lanterns and flag decorations. The act of releasing the lantern and krathong symbolizes letting go of all ills and misfortunes in the previous year, and Buddhists also believe that if you make a wish when you set off the lantern, it will come true
23 November 18Loy Krathong FestivalSukhothaiThailand Festivals Sukhothai. In the early evening, among the ruins of this once great city, the ancient temples once more come alive to celebrate Loy Krathong. It is here as the buildings are lightly bathed by an array of colourful lights that they once more take on a new reverence and majesty, which is lovingly complimented by the candle lit Krathong’s, as they are released to the surrounding water and the Sky Lanterns that are sent high into the ink black night sky.
25 November 18 Last Sunday of every NovemberMonkey Buffet FestivalLopburi‘Monkey Buffet Festival’ (the first festival only took place in 1989). It is held near the Khmer temple of Phra Prang Sam Yot near the railway station in the Old Town of Lopburi, aptly nicknamed “the city of monkeys,” If you get the opportunity do check out the temple as it is a great example of the architecture from the Angkor/Khmer Empire.

Thailand Highlights

  • Cruise the waterways of the capital by ‘klong-taxi’
  • Trek in the highlands of the infamous Golden Triangle
  • Discover the catch of the day brought ashore on a white sandy beach
  • Learn how to prepare some of the tasteful Thai dishes
  • Lounge with a cocktail at a trendy bar on a southern beach
  • Relax blissfully thanks to the ancient art of Thai massage
  • Scrub an elephant behind its ear in a jungle stream
  • Browse for northern delicacies on Mae Hong Song night market
  • Sail on an old junk and enjoy an isolated beach
  • Smile back at herds of school kids when visiting hill tribe villages

Contact Thailand

THAILAND OFFICE

2nd Floor, Boonmitr Building
138 Silom Road, Bang Rak
Bangkok 10500, Thailand
t. +66 (0)2634 4922
f. +66 (0)2634 4927
e. info_th@asialink-holidays.com

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